Research Ethics Category

Researcher in China builds first engineered human

In a stunning first in genetic engineering, a Chinese researcher has engineered a human. This incredible achievement is one of a number of firsts coming from China recently in the area of genetic engineering. But is all of this at a cost to our morals? Can we allow this path to continue in one region […]

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China’s Dominance in Pushing the Genetic Engineering Envelope

Hello Ethic Nutters, In the news another first to take note of by China.  Remember just a little earlier this year the cloning of primates, well now Chinese scientists have achieved the birth of baby mice by “two mums and no dad”. See the following link for the BBC story: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45801043 It can be certain, as […]

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Cloning in the News

Hello Ethics Nutters, Another step towards being able to successfully clone humans was made last week. In China, scientists were able to clone macaque monkeys to improve biomedical research. To read more about the news without the media spin check out bioethics.net (http://www.bioethics.net/2018/01/monkey-see-human-do-cloning-macaque-monkeys-with-fetal-cells/) To read the actual article that will be published in the February […]

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Quaker Oats and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission

Hello Ethics Nutters, I’ve only recently become aware of the Quaker Oats U.S. Atomic Energy Commission study on disabled children. Very strange that I have not heard about it earlier. It’s less about the radiation and more about the history of using children in research that were in care homes for the disabled (e.g. Willowbrook). […]

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Doktor Kuckenmeister’s Gruesome Experiment

Herr Doktor Friedrich Kuckenmeister conducted a pioneering medical experiment on a prisoner awaiting execution. He persuaded the prison authorities to allow him to feed the unfortunate man a soup made from meat laced with cysts. Six weeks later the man was hanged, and when he was cut down, Kuckenmeister performed an autopsy. He found the […]

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Research Bias

I’ve come across a TED Talk when searching for interesting video’s to watch on research ethics. I found this interesting talk by Garry Gray. The talk is about the ethical dilemmas that professors face and whether they face an increased risk of bias for those who fund their research. It’s an interesting short video for […]

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The Strange Fate of Eben Byers

Fall Guy In November 1927, a wealthy industrialist named Eben Byers was returning from the annual Harvard-Yale football game aboard a special chartered train. Yale won the game 14-0, and Byers was a Yale alumnus. It’s not clear whether the celebratory atmosphere aboard the train (or Byers’s reputation as a ladies’ man) had anything to […]

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With ICH GCP E6 (R2) the emphasis is on Quality Management

For 19 years ICH GCP E6 has not changed. Now, nearly two decades after its initial release, change is coming. Perhaps the biggest difference is the focus and preeminence of Quality Management. A modernized quality standard for clinical study processes is being espoused which is driving the adoption of Quality-by-Design and Quality Risk Management principles […]

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Science and the Swastika: The Deadly Experiment

If you are interested in the history of research ethics that goes beyond the typical one paragraph mention that normally accompanies the line about the Nuremburg Code this video is for you. It discusses the experiments conducted in the concentration camps in a way I have not seen before and is a fascinating, humbling, and […]

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Disclosure in a Disaster Situation: Protecting Patient Privacy Rights with Public Safety

First and foremost it should be noted that the protection of a patient’s privacy is a right held by all patients regardless of ethnicity, religion, or other. It is a right which is to be respected in all situations, including that of a disaster. Patients always retain the right to determine through consent what information […]

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