Ethics Category

Should Necessity be a Defense to Murder? The Dudley and Stephens case

The focus of this paper is on determining whether necessity should be a defense to murder. In answering this I will examine the role of necessity as a defense, in the case of Dudley and Stephens vs. The Queen, in doing so I will also determine if the verdict in the case was correct. I […]

Read More

A Brief Comment on the Complexities of Sharing

Sharing is caring my friend used to say. As a fairly liberally minded University student studying moral ethics, I tended to agree. Although I was not particularly able to donate money earlier in life, I certainly donated considerable amounts of time. There were early volunteer positions for student bodies and later for the United Nations […]

Read More

AI and the Drive of the Future

With TESLA being the darling of electronic and self-driving cars, and many following their lead, AI’s role in how we will be driven, no longer drive, is of significant importance. AI itself is in early stages and far from able to analyze the full environment around a car while in motion. Not only is it […]

Read More

Treating Dax Cowart

The Dax Cowart case involves many ethical questions and issues ranging from what role physicians should play, to whether or not in this case the physicians made the right decision in treating Dax, even though it was against his decision. It is the goal of this paper to show that the physicians did, in fact, […]

Read More

Accountability. Where is it?

All too often politician’s will say one thing then do something entirely different. The need to get support often leads a politician to make claims which either cannot be supported in real terms or for which there was never a true desire to fulfill. Sometimes these statements are made to a wide and large audience […]

Read More

Kierkegaard and the attainment of faith

Upon first reading, it is apparent that Kierkegaard writing Fear and Trembling pseudonymously as Johannes de Silentio, which translates to John of Silence, is dealing with the teleological suspension of the ethical and yet with a great deal more. In this paper, I will examine the purpose of the book, which I take to be […]

Read More

Expanding on Good

The purpose of this brief is to expand on an earlier post which had within it a definition of Good in its abstraction. A unique definition I thought of while studying in my final year at the University of Toronto. The definition of Good as thought by me, recently edited for clarity, is the following: […]

Read More

Editing human embryos “morally permissible”

July 17, 2018 While we can tell an acorn from an oak tree, it doesn’t stop the acorn from growing into an oak tree. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-44849034

Read More

Henry Sidgwick Intuitionalism and Four Conditions in Determining Trust Worthy Conclusions

In “The Methods of Ethics”, Henry Sidgwick is looking for the proper moral code to use in order to figure out what is it people “ought” to do. In doing so he examines three moral theories seriously, Egoistic hedonism, Universalistic hedonism also known as utilitarianism, and Intuitionalism. Of these three, it is Henry Sidgwick’s review […]

Read More

Flip it and Reverse it

Over the years I continue to look at the world through an ethical lens, it’s unavoidable after 5 years of morality, ethics, law, and theological lectures. Often people complain today on social media about how this person said this, or this person did that. It is a remarkable equalizer in terms of social justice with […]

Read More