Applied Ethics Category

Asia’s Different Standard

One distinction between the two cultures in human rights issues is that Western human rights issues are very orientated towards the individual while in Asia it is more towards the state and the well-being of everyone. While in the West, ones individual rights can supersede that of the states, such would never be the case […]

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Vulgar Relativism – Bernard Williams & Charles Taylor

Williams views “vulgar relativism” as a disgusting moral view in philosophy. Normally referred to as moral relativism, this moral view holds that what is right can only be determined as what is right for that specific society at that specific time, whichever the time and society may be. Williams uses three propositions when defining what […]

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Security as a Basic Right

Henry Shue formulates an argument in “Basic Right Subsistence, Affluence, and U.S. Foreign Policy,” for the claim that each person has a right to physical security. This right would protect people from being subjected to murder, torture, mayhem, rape, or assault. Although this right seems to need no argument for it as it is seemingly […]

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T.W. Pogge: The Current Global Economic Order Manifests Radical Inequality

T.W. Pogge makes an argument for the conclusion that the wealthy citizens and governments are violating a negative duty of justice when they coercively exclude the poor from a share of proportional resource through collaboration with the ruling elites of poor countries. In doing so he outlines radical inequality as having the five following elements: […]

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Enemy of the People: A perspective on a classic

Hello Ethic Nutters, I’m posting a paper of mine written during my Masters while in Linkoping, Sweden. The course was Social and Political Ethics and I was assigned the task to review the play by Henrik Ibsen “An Enemy of the People” which I didn’t know at the time held immense importance in Political Ethics. […]

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Globalisation and Global Justice

In the article “The Problems of Global Justice” Thomas Nagel looks at two theories of global justice and assess their feasibility. The two theories he looks at are cosmopolitanism and the second which he dubs political conception and which is exemplified by Rawls’ theory presented in the book “The Law of Peoples”. Nagel briefly brings […]

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Lecture by Bertrand Russell on Individual and Social Ethics

Following up from my last blog, I’ve stumbled upon a lecture by Bertrand Russell (part of a series of lectures) first broadcast by the BBC in 1948. It’s interesting to hear his teachings directly from him. At only a little less then 30 min, it’s interesting and definitely time well spent. To view the video, […]

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Review of Jennifer Hawkins Exploitation and Developing Countries

Jennifer Hawkins in her paper on exploitation and research ethics recognizes two principles of research which are being violated in many developing countries. She refers to the first principle as the principle of standard care, and the second principle the principle of clinical equipoise. Although these two principles seem to be logically inextricable, Hawkins notices […]

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Thoughts on Peter Singer’s “Famine, Affluence, and Morality”

In the article Famine, Affluence, and Morality Singer argues for the position that the entire way we look at moral issues needs to be altered. The most crucial premise in Singers argument is this: “if it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening, without thereby sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, we […]

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